About Us

History of The Stained Glass Centre

The Stained Glass Centre was established in 2008 by the recently-formed Stained Glass Trust, with the aim of providing an educational centre to encourage the study and appreciation of stained glass, as well as breathing life back into St Martin-cum-Gregory. This beautifully evocative Grade I listed building, which dates back to before the 11th century, is home to a rich range of historic glass, including some of the earliest logos to be seen in stained glass and memorials to celebrated glass-painters.

Set in the city of York, home to much of Britain’s surviving ancient glass and a focus for craft and creativity in the modern day practice of stained glass making, The Stained Glass Centre provides a unique point of interpretation for the city, with demonstrations, workshops, guided tours and lectures.

Founding Aims

The Stained Glass Centre was established with five long-term aims for its future role

  • The Stained Glass Centre will be a national resource for the discovery and interpretation of stained glass.
  • Visitors will be able to participate in, and learn about, craft-skills, arts and industries that continue to play a vital role in the life of the city and region.
  • Practitioners from all over the UK will have a national centre of excellence for the study and development of their craft.
  • People of all ages will have the opportunity to learn about the historic importance of this beautiful art form as well as helping it to develop and flourish for the 21st century.
  • The creation of the Stained Glass Centre in the former church of St Martin-cum-Gregory will give new life to one of York’s most beautiful ‘lost’ buildings.

Regeneration

The establishment of the Stained Glass Centre within the former church of St Martin-cum-Gregory aims to give stunning new life to a magnificent building, with the exciting opportunity for regular public access to one of York’s most beautiful ‘lost’ buildings, and to see, and have interpreted, its lovely fittings and glass. Through the Centre, residents of central York can reclaim aspects of their own local history, participate in, and learn about, craft-skills, arts and industries which continue to play a vital role in the life of the city and region.

The Stained Glass Centre also plays a key role in the re-awakening of Micklegate, which once was, and could be again, York’s most important and elegant street. The Centre works closely with the Micklegate Quarter, hosting and participating in events for the local community.